All posts tagged: complications of Rheumatoid Arthritis

RA nodules

Rheumatoid nodules are commonly talked about when rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is discussed. It might surprise you to know that only 7% of those newly diagnosed with RA have rheumatoid nodules. So they are not characteristic symptoms of newly diagnosed RA. Photo: Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners Overtime, about 25% of those with positive Rheumatoid Factor (RF) develop nodules. Nodules are frequently present in the more severe cases of RA, those more likely to have rapid progression of joint destruction and to develop vasculitis.  75% of those with Felty’s syndrome, more common in white males, have rheumatoid nodules. Current smokers with RA plus nodules usually have more severe disease. In those with seronegative rheumatoid arthritis, about 6% develop rheumatoid nodules. The condition of having rheumatoid nodules is called rheumatoid nodulosis. The nodules form below the skin near joints. They are firm and frequently moveable. They are not tender and are not usually harmful. They are 2 mm (.008 inch) to 5 cm (2 inch) and may occur singly or in clusters. They are formed …

RA and cancer support

Cancer and RA seem to go hand in hand. Shortly after I was diagnosed with RA,  I was diagnosed with two different cancers, thyroid cancer and then breast cancer.  I had the big C hanging over me like a grey cloud, leading me down the cancer road with all the usual experiences.  After surgeries and after radiation treatments, I started looking for help, for support. I found it with the Cancer Support Now Third Annual Long Term Effects of Cancer Survivorship Conference.  A long name worth repeating as I became totally impressed with this organization. Dava Gerard, MD, a respected physician in the cancer field, gave the talk ¨The Journey: From Surviving to Thriving¨.  It was just what I needed.  Arti Prasad, MD presented ¨Holistic Cancer Survivorship¨.  Again excellent. There were breakout sessions. Free lunch from Jason’s Deli. The morning had started with a generous breakfast. I felt welcomed and very glad to be there. Since then, I have joined the board of Cancer Support Now and am on the committee for this year’s conference. Both are big commitments …

The challenge of Feet

My rheumatologist sent me to a podiatrist, a foot doctor.                 Charming man. Once a client of mine.        X-rays were ordered, the podiatrist way. Standing. Weight bearing. Three views each.  For the third view I climbed steps  and was x-rayed  at foot level.   A  much better test than the standard foot  x-rays. Results: persistent degenerative changes with in the feet bilaterally. I admit that this was expected. What happens next?  My doc said surgery is not the answer.  As my feet get worse he feels steroid injections would be helpful. Now it is important that I wear shoes that fit  well and offer good support.  I should also wear special inserts (Motion Control performance insoles by Prothotics). I got the inserts first.  They are so much better than anything you will find at Target or Walmart. They have support for feet in areas that are thinning in RA. He suggested our New Balance store or REI.  New Balance was closer. They fitted the inserts and fitted …