All posts filed under: Books

This is a selection of books that I have read and found useful.

New Book to read

My copy of Kelly Young’s new book, Rheumatoid Arthritis Unmasked, arrived a few minutes ago. I look forward to a good read. Kelly is also known as the RA Warrior. Her web site has been a port in the storm for those who are dealing with complex problems due to their RA. She has RA or RD as she would say. In spite of her personal health challenges she is a major advocate for those of us who have RA. My thanks go out to her.

Wrapping your head around RA

When I was diagnosed with RA, I was too sick to understand the long term implications. I was grateful at the time to put a label on the devastating attack on my body. I love books and have always looked to books for solutions as well as for pleasure. Soon after my diagnosis, I purchased the book, The First Year Rheumatoid Arthritis by M.E.A. McNeil. With RA there is a major shift in your life. What to do? How to cope? What to think? It is overwhelming. This book set me on the right course. It helped me organize.

Maneuvering the medical system

  Treat Me, Not My Age is written by geriatrician, Mark Lachs, MD*.   The book discusses Why you should be an informed patient  How to become  informed The pitfalls of being an aging patient in our current medical system How to take charge and  maneuver the medical system maze There are doctors who do nothing for  aging patients even though appropriate, aggressive treatment may improve the life and well-being in the elderly the same as someone younger. over treat aging patients, not understanding the patient’s health situation. talk down to an elderly patient and blow off patient’s concerns attributing them to aging problems instead of symptoms of disease. Over 98,000 Americans die each year due to medical errors. Many more are injured. The average primary doctor has about 2000 patients.  Dr. Lachs makes clear the perils we face as patients. He then offers  a guide to managing medical issues that we encounter as we age. He believes “…the most important primary care provider is you.”  It is your life. You are the one who needs to keep track of what …