All posts filed under: Self Management

What is it that I do to help myself

Four years with RA

It was four years this month that I was officially diagnosed with Rheumatoid Arthritis. Learning to accept my situation and learning to manage my disease was not easy. Pain is constant. It just varies in intensity. Fatigue is overwhelming and was constant the first few years. The RA process of medication trial and error was discouraging. Medication side effects were hard to tolerate. Underneath it all, the knowledge of living with a progressive disease was disconcerting. Add to the mix, I was diagnosed with stage three thyroid cancer and breast cancer the same year that I was diagnosed with the RA. Both included surgery and radiation treatment. Yet here I am four years later. I am still struggling but I am surviving and maybe thriving. I wake in pain. I go to bed in pain. Pain is discouraging and even depressing. Many of my joints are affected by RA. Fingers, toes, feet and hands, elbows, wrists, shoulders and jaw. So, I am blanketed in pain. I take meloxicam and methylprednisolone for inflammation. I take gabapentin …

RA, stuffed green peppers and pacing

My podiatrist thinks people with RA have an amazing positive attitude. He says it is unique to his patients with RA. I can understand that. We have no choice but to manage our disease. So we do. We plod along solving our issues for pain and all the issues large scale damage to our bodies’ joints give us.   If we fail to pick up the responsibility, even more severe pain and disability are but steps away. We figure out how to manage grueling pain, random flares that send us to Medrol packs and heavy pain medications. Limping around on feet that feel like numb bricks. Energy that seeps away until we are but rag dolls wishing for rest. Learning to manage a painful existence isn’t easy. Those of us with RA just do it. We are experts on hot packs, splints, braces, pacing, and on it goes.  Pacing works well for me. I manage a lot following the concept.  Generally, it is working for short stints interspersed with resting activities. My pain medication is on …

RA: to run and hide or to jump into the fray

  I have passed the three-year mark with the official diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis.  I am better in some ways. I can work the disease better. I am worse in some ways. The damn thing just won’t go away. I remember when I realized that I only see my rheumatologist at best every six weeks and at worst every three months. I realized that I was on my own most of the time. I was on my own to manage my rheumatoid arthritis, two cancers, my home, my life. And if I didn’t take charge, no one would. At 72, I had better get busy. I did think about it. One choice was to withdraw into myself. My rheumatologist said many do. I also had the choice of focusing on the here and now and managing my situation. Historically, when I have been in a bad place I have felt sorry for myself a bit. I call it whining. A little is okay. It is just something a person sometimes needs to go through. Eventually, …