All posts tagged: Rheumatoid Arthritis Classification

Elderly Onset Rheumatoid Arthritis

Blog: EORA, Elderly Onset Rheumatoid Arthritis October 2019 As we get older, our youthful bodies start to lose some of the agility and endurance we have always expected of ourselves. We slow down. Late nights aren’t as fun as they used to be. Food choices change. Spicy food may suddenly seem too spicy. Climbing stairs isn’t quite as easy as it once was. Aging is a gradual process and we adjust to it as we go. Some of us feel lucky to be alive. We have friends and family who have died from cancer or heart disease. We may have the experience of surviving war, illness or accidents. And we have finally learned that we are not immortal. We see the calendar pages fly by and are starting to wonder about the condition of our maturing bodies. We look more closely at our medical insurance plan and we start making appointments with our primary care providers. We are prescribed the classic medications, a statin and maybe  a blood pressure pill. We promise ourselves to walk …

what website has the best RA info

  Maneuvering the tangled jungle of internet information can be extremely frustrating. There is a lot of misleading information by reputable sites.  A lot of information is summarized and then vaguely  jumps to  faulty assumptions.  All this adds to our confusion.   Reputable resources may vaguely summarize information for patient information sheets. The American College of Rheumatology is a good  resource for general information about  RA.  However, patient information sheets are generalized and vague.  I wonder if the science writers think we are too dumb to get the real stuff.  A lot of our confusion about RA stems from getting peace meal information that is vague.  Rheumatologists actually do use the 2010 Rheumatoid Arthritis Classification Criteria to assist diagnosis.  Why don’t they tell us about it?  It sounds pretty black and white to me.  PubMed comments on the criteria show how the new criteria is the game changer tool to diagnose RA. The classification tree of the 2010 Rheumatoid Arthritis Classification Criteria is worth checking out. Johns Hopkins Arthritis Center is a respected source of Rheumatoid …

How the docs diagnose RA

The course of RA is unique to each of us.  My RA announced itself  to me as  big and boisterous.  Initially, I had sharp pain in my left shoulder.  I thought it was from swimming as shoulders do get a workout in lap swimming.  Quickly hands, fingers, wrists, ankles, feet and toes joined in.  I was in total pain and largely incapacitated.  I sought salvation to my problem in the ER, the only solution at the time. In 2010 the American College of Rheumatology(ACR) and the European League Against Rheumatism(EULAR) formed a working group to replace the 1987 ACR classification criteria for RA with up to date classification criteria. RA is at its most destructive in the first 2 years.  It needs to be caught early and treated aggressively.  The 2010 Rheumatoid Arthritis Classification Criteria became a big diagnostic help. The group came up with a 10 point system that covers four RA categories:  joint involvement, serology, acute-phase reactants, duration of symptoms.  The target population for this scoring must be patients who have at least …